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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xk81jp416
Title: UNDER PEACEFUL SKIES: THE EFFECTS OF AERIAL IMAGE COLLECTION AND VERIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES ON UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING
Authors: Essig, Alexander
Advisors: Kurtzer, Daniel
Department: Woodrow Wilson School
Class Year: 2020
Abstract: The research explores the ways in which modern image collection and verification technologies, as well as the respective commercial markets that have grown up around them, impact the U.N. Security Council’s capacity to fulfill three peacekeeping mandates: (1) the U.N. Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO), (2) the U.N. Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), and (3) the U.N. Disengagement Observer Force in the Golan Heights (UNDOF). The thesis seeks to respond to the following questions: (1) what are modern image collection and verification technologies, (2) what are the basic operational, strategic, and market characteristics of two image collection technologies—unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and remote sensors—and one verification technology—image provenance instruments, and (3) how have these technologies evolved to become essential assets within the U.N. Security Council’s broader portfolio of peacekeeping tools? The analysis illustrates that image collection and verification technologies offer the potential to enhance peacekeeper security and civilian protection and to enhance international efforts to hold individuals accountable for war crimes. Drawing from specific lessons learned in each of three case studies, the thesis suggests the persistence of robust political and administrative constraints that inhibit the incorporation of image collection and verification technologies into peacekeeping operations. The thesis offers policy recommendations that advance the current academic literature on contemporary peacekeeping technologies and their use to enhance peacekeeper and civilian safety. This thesis serves as a guide for U.N. Force Commanders, the U.N. Security Council, U.N. administrators, diplomats, politicians, peacekeepers, and human rights activists interested in understanding the real-world benefits, consequences, and future applications of modern image collection and verification technologies.
URI: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01xk81jp416
Type of Material: Princeton University Senior Theses
Language: en
Appears in Collections:Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, 1929-2020

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