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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01pc289m951
Title: Large Diameter Nanoparticle Building Blocks for the Bottom-Up Synthesis of Plasmonically Active Artificial Molecules
Authors: Emerson, Nyssa Takara
Advisors: Yang, Haw
Contributors: Chemistry Department
Keywords: Affinity chromatography
Artificial molecule
Fluorescence enhancement
Gold nanoparticle
Plasmonics
Self-assembly
Subjects: Chemistry
Physical chemistry
Nanoscience
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: Princeton, NJ : Princeton University
Abstract: DNA-mediated self-assembly of nanoparticles labelled with a specified number of DNA oligonucleotides has proven powerful for organizing nanocrystals into complex, multimeric nanostructures akin to "artificial molecules." This capability is particularly interesting for metallic nanoparticles because they electronically couple, which gives rise to emergent properties such as distance-dependent changes in their optical response or massive near-field enhancement. As the magnitude of plasmonic coupling scales with the size of the nanoparticle, large diameter nanoparticles (>30 nm) are required substrates for these applications. Due to their large size and greater colloidal instability, it has proven extremely challenging to isolate large nanoparticles labelled with a specified number of DNA molecules. In this dissertation, I describe the development of a purification technology, DNA-based affinity chromatography, which permits the isolation of nanoparticles up to 80 nm in diameter labelled with a single molecule of DNA for the first time. These monovalent nanoparticles can be used effectively as building blocks to self-assemble plasmonically active artificial molecules. A number of examples are demonstrated, including the synthesis of optical antennas which can enhance the fluorescence emission of nearby molecules. With access to larger diameter nanoparticle building blocks, it should be possible to prepare a variety of plasmonically active nanocomposites which heretofore have been synthetically inaccessible.
URI: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01pc289m951
Alternate format: The Mudd Manuscript Library retains one bound copy of each dissertation. Search for these copies in the library's main catalog: catalog.princeton.edu
Type of Material: Academic dissertations (Ph.D.)
Language: en
Appears in Collections:Chemistry

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