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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01n009w244g
Title: A DECOMPOSITION OF THE UNITED STATES EMPLOYMENT-TO-POPULATION RATIO: AN ANALYSIS OF LONG-RUN AND SHORT-RUN DRIVERS
Authors: Liu, Jessie
Advisors: Fernandez-Villaverde, Jesus
Department: Economics
Class Year: 2014
Abstract: This paper examines the short- and long-run drivers of the employment-topopulation ratio from 1950 to 2013. Specifically, the employment-to-population ratio is decomposed into the employment rate, participation rate, and population ratio. I observe how changes in each factor impact the ratio. Results are also broken down by race, ethnicity, and gender. Additionally, the demographic component of the employment-to-population ratio is projected for twenty years. I find that changes in the participation rate and age demographics are the medium- to long-run drivers of the employment-to-population ratio and that the black ratios tend to be more affected by changes in demographics for young- to middle-aged cohorts, while white ratios tend to be more affected by changes in demographics for middle- to old-aged cohorts. Projections of the employment-to-population ratio show that the ratio will decline 2-3% over the next twenty years, necessitating public policy changes.
Extent: 83 pages
URI: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01n009w244g
Type of Material: Princeton University Senior Theses
Language: en_US
Appears in Collections:Economics, 1927-2016

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