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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01j098zd559
Title: FREQUENCY AND RATE OF BAHAMIAN BROWN ANOLE LIZARD INJURIES IN THE PRESENCE OF PREDATORS AND COMPETITORS
Authors: Ferlmann, Anne
Advisors: Pringle, Robert
Department: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Class Year: 2016
Abstract: Anole lizard injuries could be caused by two main sources: competition or predation. This study measures the frequency and rate of various Bahamian brown anole (A. sagrei) injuries incurred on islands with introduced predators and/or competitors. Based on previous research, I predicted that most brown anole injuries would occur on islands with both competitors and predators since the presence of predators has been found to push brown anoles up further into the tree canopy where the competing species resides. Instead, I found that (1) the rate and frequency of front digit loss, tail damage, and total number of injuries are substantially lower on islands with only predators than those with only competitors and (2) increased brown anole density correlates with an increase in total injuries incurred by brown anoles. These findings suggest that inter- and intraspecific competition, as opposed to predation intensity, may be the primary cause of various brown anole injuries. The presence of the predator may simply serve as a mechanism for increased habitat overlap and, therefore, competition between brown anoles and their competitors.
Extent: 36 pages
URI: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01j098zd559
Type of Material: Princeton University Senior Theses
Language: en_US
Appears in Collections:Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 1992-2016

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