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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01cv43nw984
Title: WHERE’S THE BEEF? CULTURAL AND SOCIOECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF MEAT CONSUMPTION IN BRAZIL
Authors: Smith, Peter
Advisors: Hamilton, Tod
Department: Sociology
Class Year: 2014
Abstract: Elevated meat production and consumption in Brazil have major health and environmental consequences. This study pursues inroads to widespread reduction by connecting consumer action with supply-side developments, and investigating the influence of culture and socioeconomic status on meat consumption. The data comes from 47 interviews at a clinic and vegetarian restaurant in São Paulo, and the 2008-2009 Household Budget Survey, which recorded the eating habits of 27,762 adults nationwide. Environmental impact is analyzed using benchmarks for sustainable convergence. Interview respondents concur that meat is dominant in Brazilian cuisine, but their health attitudes can either promote or discourage meat intake. Only 35% of adults consume all meat sustainably, while 54% sustainably consume ruminants. Region, gender, and income are the most significant determinants. The findings confirm health concerns as central motivators for reduced intake, highlight the role of affluent consumers in transforming meat’s symbolism, and indicate the need for targeted information campaigns.
Extent: 108 pages
URI: http://arks.princeton.edu/ark:/88435/dsp01cv43nw984
Type of Material: Princeton University Senior Theses
Language: en_US
Appears in Collections:Sociology, 1954-2016

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